Spectratech develops OEG-16H to communicate with comatose patients

21 June 2016 (Last Updated June 21st, 2016 18:30)

Japan-based medical technology company Spectratech has developed its fNIRS device, OEG-16H, an encephalography mechanism to measure changes in hemoglobin and apparent arterial oxygen saturation in the frontal lobe of comatose patients.

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Japan-based medical technology company Spectratech has developed its fNIRS device, OEG-16H, an encephalography mechanism to measure changes in hemoglobin and apparent arterial oxygen saturation in the frontal lobe of comatose patients.

The device is based on Spectratech-developed Ultrahigh SNR technology which can display ultra-weak pulse waves and allow users the ability to perform a multi-channel brain localisation analysis.

Its index of Apparent SpO2 (apparent arterial oxygen saturation) facilitates a better understanding of how to influence the actions from cerebral circulation / metabolism to brain function by the Ultrahigh SNR technology.

The easy to carry, battery-operated device includes a monitor, a main unit, head modules, software, optical phantom, BNC cable for external input, manual event trigger input, USB cable, and an AC adapter.

The Spectratech OEG-16 H can operate on Microsoft Windows 7 or 8 and its own dedicated software.

"The device translates brain waves into data allowing a simultaneous measurement of hemoglobin at multiple points."

The instrument offers constant connectivity with six light injection points, six optical light-receiving points, and 16-channel measure points in the lightweight head module.

The device translates brain waves into data allowing a simultaneous measurement of hemoglobin at multiple points.

Additionally, the distributor allows medical technicians to implement hyperscanning.

Spectratech aims to interpret chemical changes in the brain by means of this fNIRS technology to establish patterns of communication with comatose patients.


Image: The Spectratech OEG-16 H tin use. Photo: courtesy of PRNewsFoto / Ampronix.