Teva collaborates with Intel to develop wearable device to help treat Huntington disease

15 September 2016 (Last Updated September 15th, 2016 18:30)

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries has collaborated with Intel Corporation to develop a wearable device and machine learning platform that can be used by patients suffering from Huntington disease (HD).

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries has collaborated with Intel Corporation to develop a wearable device and machine learning platform that can be used by patients suffering from Huntington disease (HD).

This platform will enable continuous monitoring and analysis of important symptoms that impact daily living, thereby helping to gain a better understanding of disease progression to improve treatment.

The collaboration will see deployment of the new technology platform in a sub-study within the ongoing Phase 2 Open-Pride HD Study.

"This platform will enable continuous monitoring and analysis of important symptoms that impact daily living, thereby helping to gain a better understanding of disease progression to improve treatment."

Under this study, patients will have to use a smartphone and wear a smartwatch equipped with sensing technology that will measure their general functioning and movement.

The data gathered will be wirelessly sent to a cloud-based platform specifically developed by Intel to analyse data from wearable devices.

The data will be translated by proprietary algorithms in near real-time, into objective scores of motor symptom severity.

Teva global research and development president and chief scientific officer Michael Hayden said: "The aim of this important project is to provide continuous objective data on the impact of Huntington disease on the patient, and, by extension, a clear understanding of the impact of treatment on patients' quality of life.

"Current measurement of symptoms is largely based on observation when the patient sees the doctor.

“This technology now provides us with an opportunity to have continuous monitoring.

"This unique technology could complement future trials in HD.”

The study will commence by the end of the year and will take place in centres in the US and Canada.