Pakistan’s Byonyks develops device for bloodless dialysis

4 September 2020 (Last Updated September 4th, 2020 15:10)

A biotechnology start-up in Pakistan, led by experts of a US-based company Byonyks Medical Devices, has developed a device, which will make dialysis process bloodless and affordable for kidney patients.

Pakistan’s Byonyks develops device for bloodless dialysis
The device enables kidney patients to undergo blood dialysis at home without extracting blood from the body. Credit: Manu5.

A biotechnology start-up in Pakistan, led by experts of a US-based company Byonyks Medical Devices, has developed a device, which will make dialysis process bloodless and affordable for kidney patients.

Considered to be Pakistan’s first bloodless risk-free dialysis machine, the device has been developed by the company in collaboration with Pakistan’s Ignite, which funds innovative start-ups, and angel investors.

The device, called Robo-Kidney, is designed to enable kidney patients to undergo blood dialysis at home without extracting blood from the body. It also eliminates the chance of contraction of disease such as HIV or hepatitis C infections, a risk usually associated with traditional dialysis practices.

It uses an automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) method of dialysis. The method involves a special machine to removes toxins and excess fluid from the body by instilling fluid in the stomach and subsequently draining it.

Byonyks founder and CEO Farrukh Usman said: “Robo-Kidney is an affordable and bloodless machine that will allow kidney patients to receive dialysis treatment from the comfort of their homes.”

According to reports, the device is currently being evaluated and trial data is being collected for feedback and patient health progress.

The government plans to manufacture the device on a commercial basis after receiving regulatory approvals with the aim of making dialysis affordable and convenient for kidney patients in the country.

Over 20 million people suffer from kidney disease in Pakistan. Kidney transplants and dialysis are the two options available to people with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Hemodialysis, which is performed at a dialysis centre, is an expensive and time-consuming process, which the patients are required to undergo multiple times a month.