Pathnostics launches PCR test to detect acute Covid-19 infection

21 May 2020 (Last Updated May 21st, 2020 14:53)

Diagnostic solutions company Pathnostics has launched a Covid-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory test that detects acute infections.

Diagnostic solutions company Pathnostics has launched a Covid-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory test that detects acute infections.

The test has been designed to support the US healthcare workers in their efforts to keep their patients, colleagues and workplaces safe.

Administered using a simple nasal swab, the test detects the genetic information of the virus within 24 to 48 hours. It helps the identification of three regions of the SARS-CoV 2 RNA.

To ensure the safety of healthcare and other essential workers during transit of the sample to the laboratory, the sample is collected in a Pathnostics’ proprietary buffer package that inactivates the virus.

Moreover, the test does not require an out-of-pocket patient expense and is billed directly to insurance.

The company noted that it developed the new test after its customers who specialise in emergency, mobile and post-acute healthcare proposed a test that is easy to administer and adept at identifying people with active Covid-19 infection.

Pathnostics founder and chief scientific officer Dr David Baunoch said: “Pathnostics is committed to helping to build testing capacity during the Covid-19 crisis, particularly to support providers and other workers in the healthcare industry as they continue their essential work.

“Along with our Covid-19 PCR test, we will be launching a respiratory panel assay in the near future with the goal of identifying additional pathogens, which might be impacting Covid-19 patients, particularly those in long-term care situations.”

The company will perform the new PCR test as a Laboratory Developed Test (LDT) based on Thermo Fisher Scientific’s TaqPath RT-PCR COVID-19 Kit.

In March, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted emergency use authorisation (EUA) to the Thermo Fisher’s TaqPath test.