Queen’s University uses Almac’s test for prostate cancer

25 October 2017 (Last Updated October 25th, 2017 19:55)

Queen’s University in Belfast, UK, has demonstrated the use of personalised medicine firm Almac Diagnostics’ Metastatic Assay in a research study performed to gain better insights on prostate cancer tumours.

Queen’s University uses Almac’s test for prostate cancer
New diagnostic test could transform prostate cancer treatment. Credit: Almac Group.

Queen’s University in Belfast, UK, has demonstrated the use of personalised medicine firm Almac Diagnostics’ Metastatic Assay in a research study performed to gain better insights on prostate cancer tumours.

Almac’s diagnostic test is a gene expression biomarker designed to detect prostate cancer patients having an aggressive form of the disease.

By analysing tumour genetics, the test allows identification of tumour type, slow-growing or aggressive, as well as the extent of aggressive type of tumour.

In the study, the researchers used Metastatic Assay on prostate biopsies of 248 patients who previously received prostate cancer treatment.

Intended to aid in the transformation of prostate cancer treatment, the study aimed to understand the type and genetics of the cancer for allowing clinicians to devise an effective treatment plan.

"We believe it will play an important role in identifying men who may benefit from treatment intensification."

According to the results, the test was more effective when compared to conventional clinical tests.

Almac Diagnostics global vice-president and medical director professor Richard Kennedy said: “The assay has now proven to be superior to conventional clinical tests at predicting aggressive disease in two independent studies, the first of which used surgical tissue, while this study used tissue taken from needle biopsy.

“We believe it will play an important role in identifying men who may benefit from treatment intensification.”

The ability of the test to enable delivery of accurate treatment is expected to aid in eliminating the need for more intensive treatment or higher radiotherapy dosages in case of patients with disease relapse.