SentiAR gets new funding for research on AR cardiac hologram

13 February 2018 (Last Updated February 13th, 2018 10:50)

US-based healthcare technology firm SentiAR has received a new grant from the National Institutes for Health (NIH) for further research on its augmented reality (AR) software to allow better visualisation during cardiac surgeries and additional interventional procedures.

SentiAR gets new funding for research on AR cardiac hologram
SentiAR awarded federal grant to advance AR cardiac hologram research. Credit: BioSTL.

US-based healthcare technology firm SentiAR has received a new grant from the National Institutes for Health (NIH) for further research on its augmented reality (AR) software to allow better visualisation during cardiac surgeries and additional interventional procedures.

The $2.2m of milestone-based instalments are intended to advance the AR platform for providing clear, real-time control of virtual and real worlds to physicians.

This three-dimensional (3D) visualisation platform features a head-up display and uses real-time navigation feed to generate a holographic display of patient-specific anatomy.

The capability of the technology to facilitate visualisation, measuring and manipulation of real-time holographic images during medical procedures is expected to minimise operating time and radiation exposure to clinicians, and improve outcomes for patients.

“By improving the visualisation of this information and empowering the physician with direct control of the model, we will make these procedures both simpler and safer.”

SentiAR chief medical officer Dr Jennifer Silva said: “Our goal is to provide physicians who perform cardiac ablation procedures with a patient-specific hologram of the heart and the instruments that they are using inside of it.

“By improving the visualisation of this information and empowering the physician with direct control of the model, we will make these procedures both simpler and safer.

“Knowing that our peers – cardiologists and engineers – see the value of our solution and the potential impact it will have for both patients and practitioners is tremendous validation for SentiAR’s model.”

According to the firm’s CEO Jim Howard, the technology could impact approximately one million arrhythmia patients per year and is anticipated to address the existing intraprocedural visualisation challenges.