Clinical trial of SomaLogic blood protein-based test starts in UK

1 February 2019 (Last Updated February 1st, 2019 10:43)

The Leeds Centre for Personalised Medicine and Health in the UK has launched a clinical trial to investigate the use of a blood protein test in detecting the risk of disease.

Clinical trial of SomaLogic blood protein-based test starts in UK
The SomaLogic test is designed to measure changes in the levels of 5,000 proteins in blood. Credit: Alden Chadwick.

The Leeds Centre for Personalised Medicine and Health in the UK has launched a clinical trial to investigate the use of a blood protein test in detecting the risk of disease.

Developed by US-based biotech SomaLogic, the test is based on proteomics and is said to indicate an individual’s real-time health status.

The test is designed to measure changes in the levels of 5,000 proteins in blood in order to calculate the risk of a person developing certain disorders, including diabetes and heart disease.

“The researchers will use personalised health insights derived from the blood test to advise people on lifestyle changes in order to help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.”

It is based on SomaLogic platform, which delivers insights that allow biomarker discovery, diagnostics development, pharmaceutical discovery and development, and health management.

During the current trial, Leeds researchers will use personalised health insights derived from the blood test to advise people on lifestyle changes in order to help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

The cost of diabetes to the NHS in the UK is said to be over £1.5m an hour which is around 10% of the NHS budget for England and Wales.

In addition, the trial will assess the test’s effectiveness. The trial will be expanded to other clinical sites based on the findings at the Leeds Centre.

Leeds Centre for Personalised Medicine and Health head Dr Michael Messenger said: “Personalised medicine lets us take a deeper look at each person’s individual biology so we can better understand what the right advice or treatment, at the right time, might be for that person.

“Advances in science, medicine and new technologies, such as this test, help us do exactly that, which is great news for patients and their families. The test results will mean GPs can discuss with those patients lifestyle changes they could make to help them avoid the onset of diabetes, for example, helping them live healthier lives for longer.”

At present, Leeds Centre for Personalised Medicine and Health has formed multiple alliances, including with NHS Leeds Clinical Commissioning Group and local GPs, to enrol 1,000 patients from up to 24 general practices.

Additional reporting by Charlotte Edwards.