Teva Canada unveils new device for bronchial asthma treatment

6 October 2020 (Last Updated October 6th, 2020 13:21)

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries subsidiary Teva Canada has launched a new device, called Aermony RespiClick, to help people suffering from bronchial asthma.

Teva Canada unveils new device for bronchial asthma treatment
Teva Canada’s Aermony RespiClick is developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma. Credit: Teva Canada.

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries subsidiary Teva Canada has launched a new device, called Aermony RespiClick, to help people suffering from bronchial asthma.

Offered in a simple-to-use inhaler, the new device is indicated for the maintenance treatment of steroid-responsive bronchial asthma as prophylactic therapy in patients aged 12 years and above.

The fluticasone propionate inhalation powder is packaged in the device, which comes with features to ease the administration of inhaled therapy. The device has a cap that integrates the opening and priming steps while a ‘click’ sound indicates that the dose is ready.

It is designed to help reduce patients’ coordination errors and help boost their confidence in the dose and the device, the company noted.

Teva Canada general manager Christine Poulin said: “We’re pleased that Aermony RespiClick is now available in Canada. With this innovative method of delivery of medication, respirologists and asthma patients will experience the simplified administration features the RespiClick device has to offer.

Fluticasone propionate is of the main ingredients in Aermony RespiClick device. It has been extensively evaluated in clinical trials and has been available in the Canadian market since 1993.

The company said that it is launching Aermony RespiClick with a price advantage compared to the branded fluticasone propionate inhalation powder. It will be offered in three dose options – 5mcg per actuation, 113mcg per actuation, and 232mcg per actuation.

Using Aermony RespiClice, the patients are instructed to take inhalation twice a day at the same time every day with nearly 12 hours gap between each inhalation.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airway that results in breathing difficulties. It affects nearly 3.8 million people in Canada.