Thermo Fisher Scientific to buy Gatan for $925m

29 June 2018 (Last Updated June 29th, 2018 11:33)

Diagnostic products maker Thermo Fisher Scientific has signed a definitive agreement to acquire software developer Roper Technologies’ wholly owned subsidiary Gatan for about $925m.

Thermo Fisher Scientific to buy Gatan for $925m
Oncomine TCR Beta-SR Assay is a NGS solution designed for immuno-oncology research. Credit: Thermo Fisher Scientific.

Diagnostic products maker Thermo Fisher Scientific has signed a definitive agreement to acquire software developer Roper Technologies’ wholly owned subsidiary Gatan for about $925m.

Gatan manufactures instrumentation and software for improving and extending the operation and performance of electron microscopes.

The instruments offered by Gatan can be used during various analytical process steps such as specimen preparation, manipulation, analysis and imaging.

“Subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals, the acquisition is set to close by the end of this year.”

Gatan, which has operations in the US and employs around 320 people, is estimated to generate nearly $150m in revenues this year.

Thermo Fisher Scientific Analytical Instruments business president Dan Shine said: “Gatan has been a trusted supplier of components to the electron microscopy industry for many years, and we look forward to building on its strong reputation.

“Adding Gatan’s technologies to our leading electron microscopy portfolio will enhance our customer offering by creating an integrated system that seamlessly connects microscope hardware, software and accessories.”

Subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals, the acquisition is set to close by the end of this year.

Thermo Fisher also expanded its Oncomine immuno-oncology assay range with the introduction of new next-generation sequencing (NGS) solution called Oncomine TCR Beta-SR Assay.

Meant for immuno-oncology research, the assay determines T-cell clonality in the tumour microenvironment which can help in identifying potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers related to immune response.

The information on T-cell receptor diversity is also expected to enable toxicity monitoring, detection of treatment resistance, and optimisation of therapeutic T-cell manufacture and functions.

With its dual barcode indexing, the new Oncomine assay allows identification of even low-frequency clones that are said to have the potential to track minimal residual disease.