The medical imaging sector is going nuts for artificial intelligence (AI) software, and ImageBiopsy Lab is no exception as it launched its SQUIRREL module for X-ray scoliosis assessment. 

Along with announcing its launch, the Vienna, Austria-based medical imaging company also unveiled the device’s MDR CE certification.  

Scoliosis is determined when the curvature of the spine exceeds 10 degrees – a measurement known as the Cobb angle. According to some research, measuring the angle can be prone to error, and there are even slight variations depending on the time of the day the measurement takes place.  

IB Lab said it developed its technology with the aim of “improving the consistency and reliability of scoliosis assessments while promoting standardisation within the field.” 

The company trained its AI-powered IB Lab SQUIRREL with over 17,000 images and said the technology will streamline workflows, reduce human error risk, and save assessment time.  

Richard Ljuhar, IB Lab’s CEO and co-founder said: “Obtaining MDR clearance serves as a significant validation of the accuracy and quality of our SQUIRREL module. We are proud to have achieved this milestone and are looking forward to the rollout of this novel AI tool to our customers across Europe.” 

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By GlobalData

The use of AI in medical imaging is one of its biggest uses in healthcare. It facilitates a greater volume of image processing and decreases the time needed for radiographers to manually check for pathophysiology. Its growing application in cancer screening and detection is particularly apparent. A limitation of its widespread use is the requirement of modern facilities and the financial outlay required for the technology.