A ballooning market for surgical adhesion barriers

23 March 2017 (Last Updated March 23rd, 2017 10:02)

Payers, regulators, and healthcare facilities are continuously focusing on patient outcomes and quality improvement.

A ballooning market for surgical adhesion barriers

Payers, regulators, and healthcare facilities are continuously focusing on patient outcomes and quality improvement. By limiting serious post-operative complications, the surgical adhesion barriers space will grow rapidly from $575.0M in 2016 to $743.2M by 2023, representing a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 3.72%, according to research and consulting firm GlobalData

Adhesion prevention, especially in abdominal and pelvic surgeries, is highly important as the formation of adhesions can lead to post-operative complications and significant post-surgical morbidity, greatly affecting patient-centered outcomes. Besides keeping organs apart, tissue adhesives can play an indispensable role in the operative phase of wound management.

Coupled with internal tissue sealants, surgical adhesives can physically block the pathway of bleeding. In addition, aging populations are at a higher risk of developing a host of diseases and conditions necessitating the need for surgical interventions. This trend will drive higher volumes of open procedures, generating greater sales of surgical adhesion barriers.

To meet this growing need, manufacturers have introduced both film- and gel-based anti-adhesion products. A sizable portion of the market growth will be supplied by the widening market for gel adhesion barriers, which can potentially treat a wider pool of patients than membrane adhesion barriers.

Although gel adhesion barriers have been approved for sale in Europe for many years, spray-enabled gel adhesion barriers are not yet approved for sale in the US. Therefore, a vast majority of adhesion barriers sold in the North American region will be membrane-based brands.

However, GlobalData expects regulatory approval of gel adhesion barriers in the US to occur within the next five years. Following their market entry in the US, gel adhesion barriers will have significant opportunity to grow, especially in laparoscopic procedures where the need for adhesion prevention is perhaps more limited but still necessary.